Discover at your Desk Playlist 8/13/19

I get asked often at my day job, “You’re dancing at your desk, what are you listening to?”. 

As a way to help share the music that makes me move, I decided to make a rotating 10 song playlist featuring songs that make me dance at my desk.  The playlist will feature bands you’ve probably never heard of, local bands you’ve seen on posters, songs from popular bands you may have overlooked, and every now and again a throwback song that you may have forgotten from a performer’s past.

If you’re looking for a new song, artist, or album suggestion, this playlist is for you.

If you want an opportunity to brag to your friends that you heard an artist before they went mainstream, this playlist is for you.

And most importantly, if you want to know what music is making me dance at my desk at my day job, this playlist is for you.

This weeks 10 song playlist (Spotify Playlist included below):
1.) “You Don’t Love Me” – Wilderado
2.) “29” – Run River North
3.) “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free” – John Legend & The Roots
4.) “Party Police” – Alvvays
5.) “Florida Key” – The New Basement Tapes
6.) “Do You Feel This Way” – Kailee Morgue feat Whethan
7.) “4ever” – Youryoungbody
8.) “Strange Embrace” – Kitten
9.) “Graves” – CHVRCHES
10.) “The Town” – Macklemore

2 Coffee Show Review: Scarlet Parke (album release), Little Wins, and Jake Crocker (6/14/19)

This past weekend I had the opportunity to attend the album release show for Scarlet Parke.  Her new album “Flight Risk” was released the same day as the event and the eight song album was receiving positive reviews going into the show.  Scarlet is a regular fixture in the Seattle music scene.  If she isn’t performing, you’ll normally run into her at popular venues and shows in the area.  Her approachable, warm personality translates to her show and was really evident in the crowd that came to support her that evening.

The show opened with DJ producer Jake Crocker.  Jake collaborated with Scarlet on this recent album and would back Scarlet later in the night.  Jake’s DJ set was what I would describe as fun.  There wasn’t too much of a crowd early into the show, and the crowd that did populate the dance floor were mostly Jake’s close friends. At several points Jake invited his friends on stage to either give an impromptu DJ lesson or just to dance.  It wasn’t a great set, but wasn’t a bad set.  Really, it looked like Jake was having fun and his friends were having fun.  If an artist is having fun, then it translates in the show, which is why I would describe this set as “fun”.

The next set was local performer Andrew Vait’s solo act, Little Wins.  Many folks will probably recognize Andrew as a co contributor to the local band, Sisters.  I’ve always enjoyed Andrew.  He’s a solid performer and he knows how to weave through a song.  At first the crowd which had now begun to fill the room were talkative during his set, but mid way he performed a cover of the Cranberries song “Linger” and the room was mesmerized. From that point on, the crowd was respectful of his talent and you could tell, really enjoyed his set.

Finally, Scarlet Parke closed out the night.  I’ve seen Scarlet perform before.  Myself and several others in the audience would describe her performance as having an Amy Winehouse vibe but with a more Latin almost crooner kind of feel to it.  In this set, she performed the full album and also debuted a new song she created in collaboration with Little Wins.  Having never heard the album until this performance, I enjoyed it.  The songs felt like they had a different pop/r&b vibe to them.  Some songs that stood out to me were Moonlight, Distractions, Man Like You, and Never Going Home.  Overall, I enjoyed this performance. Prior Scarlet Parke shows I’ve attended felt more like a jazz r&b show with a multi instrument live band, this felt almost opposite of that.  Her backing accompaniment was minimal (I think it was just Jake Crocker) and the songs were tailored to folks looking to dance.  If you’re looking for an opportunity to dance to some great pop r&b songs with a Latin vibe, definitely check out Scarlet Parke, and pick up her latest album “Flight Risk”.

Sub Pop 30: The Most “Seattle” Event I Ever Attended

I was at Barnes and Noble when the latest copy of Uncut magazine (November 2018) caught my eye. Other than David Bowie on the cover, the magazine included a free Sub Pop mix CD compiled by label head Jonathan Poneman. The mix is a really good blend of what Sub Pop has to offer from the grunge sound that the label had become known for in its early years, to the notable “alternative” artists the label represents today. Whenever someone mentions “alternative” as a genre, it usually means “we couldn’t think of a good label to put this artist in, so because they bridge and blend genres, they are now alternative”.

20180811_130508

The mix CD was great. It motivated me to actually pick up three albums from artists I had heard for the first time on this mix (*LOMA, Mass Gothics, and King Tuff). The label head not only selected great artists to feature but picked some of their best songs. The corresponding article to the album discussed each track, but also talked about Sub Pop Fest 30, one of the most “Seattle” events I attended this past summer.

I’m from Seattle. Born and raised in West Seattle. My experience at Sub Pop Fest 30 (SPF 30) was ultimately positive, but from the weather to the crowd, SPF 30 on Alki had to be the most Seattle music event I ever attended.

20180811_122443

I remember getting to the event site and the first band to open the festival was Jo Passed. Jo Passed impressed and did a great job opening the event. The hair flipping, the running around the stage, the getting tangled in wires, it really painted a picture of what you could expect as the day went on, and really drew the crowd even as it began to rain. Once Jo Passed wrapped, the rain began to pick up. The crowd undeterred still milled around the various stages. I remember catching Moaning and LVL UP, but the next act to really catch my attention was LOMA. I had never heard LOMA before this event but their set was so different from the other sets that were presented that day, that it really stuck. It was a much softer, somber set in comparison to the heavier grunge and hip hop that populated the afternoon.

20180811_143539

I left LOMA close to the end of their set, in order to get a good spot for Bully. I was next to the front of the stage for Bully, when I ran into several people who I had met at other local shows, some as recent as a week or two prior. As Bully began to play, the group of other concert regulars and I tried to start a pit, but the crowd wasn’t into it, so we eventually let it rest. Bully was great. I had seen them perform live for the first time at this past Capitol Hill Block Party, and they played so well there, I had to see them again at this event. As they wrapped, I made sure to get a great spot for Clipping. As I was milling around the crowd I met a group of Canadians who had come down just to see Clipping. We discussed the rest fo the lineup and they had no clue who they were. They were there for Clipping. I hung with them for a while and caught Clipping’s set. They were nothing short of impressive. Aside from whipping the crowd into a frenzy, their talent showed me why these Canadians came down for this set in particular.

20180811_160108

Close to the end of Clipping’s set, I made my way to see Hot Snakes. I had caught Hot Snakes at Upstream and I had to see them again. There set was fun. I read later reviews about how it wasn’t technically proficient, but really it’s grunge/punk music. I think the point is to hear the lyrics, head bang, and mosh if you can. I remember running into a group I had met at the TacocaT show 2 weeks prior. We saw each other, and next thing you know we were moshing. I finally got to get into a pit at a Hot Snakes show! I was tired after the Hot Snakes set, and made my way to Shabazz Palaces. At this point in the afternoon, the clouds had opened up and it was a beautiful afternoon. I don’t know if it was the sudden nice weather, or that more recognizable names were taking the stages, but this is when the crowd began to swell. Up to this point in the afternoon the crowd was also a lot of people I’ve seen around the local concert scene. People you would recognize as faces in the crowd at shows. I would say around 6:15pm in the afternoon, it was less of those familiar faces, and more families, folks who didn’t seem like the regular “stand for hours for your favorite band” concert crowd, and people who were more interested in the spectacle than the music.

20180811_171815

I couldn’t see Shabazz Palaces. The crowd was too large to navigate and was it extended into the beer garden which was a “soccer field” away from the stage. I stood as close as I could get (close to the back but still mid crowd-ish), but everyone in the spot I was standing were talking full volume as the show was going on. It’s as if a concert wasn’t happening. Mid set I decided I would get a good spot for Mudhoney. I got there early and posted up mid crowd. The crowd looked excited. Many of which looked like some of their fans from the 90’s sporting various very worn Mudhoney shirts. As Mudhoney began playing, inevitably a pit formed. As I tried to make my way to it, several crowd members blocked myself and a few others from joining. This ring of dudes had decided no one was going to get past them as they wanted a great view of the show and anyone who would make them shift from their spot, would ruin it. They weren’t dancing, head banging, or smiling, they just watched the show from their spot and talked. Like the whole set they stood and chatted. Eventually it got very contentious. A lot of people got in their faces about preventing people from joining the pit or moving up, and they did things like push people back or put palms in people’s faces when they would try to talk. I felt like they had a point in not wanting others to ruin their view, but it really killed the vibe. Not to mention it didn’t seem like they were having a good time. After seeing a handful of scuffles and someone climb the port-o-pottys, I decided to check out Beach House.

20180811_190859

The crowd for Beach House was just as packed. It was full and people were talking as if a show wasn’t happening. I decided I would let this one coast and met up with a friend in the beer garden. We drank as the sun began to go down, and Beach House played in the background. We ended the night by making our way to Father John Misty. This would be my 5th time seeing Father John perform and I was pretty excited. The crowd seemed good. A lot of families were posted up for this set. There were also a lot of tense looking people. This was evident when Father John began his set, and seconds into the first song, stopped and called for security to take care of some situations that sprang up mid crowd. Father John was as incredible as he always was and as the sun hit that point between day and night where the sky was almost purple and orange, the moment was almost surreal. You had to stop, listen to Father John talk about humanity, take in the setting and Alki, and think this was a perfect ending to the event. As Father John wrapped, I made my way back to the Water Taxi and that was my memory of SPF 30.

20180811_211557

For me, SPF 30 was great before 6:15pm. I saw a lot of familiar faces, got to see a lot of bands I enjoy seeing perform live, and everyone seemed to understand regular concert etiquette. After 6:15pm, it felt tense and crowded. I felt like it wasn’t a crowd that attended shows regularly, but rather were there to see the spectacle and also catch a lot of the bigger names. This in no way is a negative. It’s good that Sub Pop was able to throw an event that could draw a diverse audience, but when people were willfully getting into fights at the drop of a hat over positions in an audience, or talking full volume during a concert not close to the back of the crowd, it makes you wonder what shows has this person attended where that was normal/acceptable behaviour? Overall, I’ll remember SPF 30 as one of the most Seattle events I’ve ever attended. On Alki, in the rain and the sun, we danced, moshed, head banged, and had a great time until it got too crowded, then those of us who were already there from the beginning made the best of the situation (haha). It was very Seattle.

20180811_180934

(All photos were taken by me. I have a bunch more from the day. The one of the sun finally coming out of the clouds, I call “My view of Shabazz Palaces from SPF 30”)

My 10 Favorite Albums of All Time (Part 2)

I think the hardest part about making a list of 10 albums that I love listening to from top to bottom, is that there are more than 10 albums I could think of that I enjoy from top to bottom. I really think lists like these are dependent on the author’s mood when they came up with the list. Know that just because I list these 10 as my favorite albums, other albums like Hunky Dory by David Bowie, 36 Chambers by Wu Tang Clan, and a number of others could have easily made my list.

Here’s the second half of my top 10 favorite albums ever in no particular order (part 2 of 2):

I Love You, Honeybear by Father John Misty – 2015 – The first time I heard Father John Misty was on the KEXP Live podcast. I thought his voice was amazing and his words were devastating. Songs like “Bored in the USA” and “Holy Shit” are what make him so great. They’re poignant and biting. It’s commentary on our daily lives, while also being somewhat satirical and sarcastic. This album is the epitome of this music style before it becomes pretentious. I always recomend this album when people want to hear music off the regular radio rotation.

Day and Age by The Killers – 2008 – Rarely is there an album I listen to where I think any of these songs could have been used as the lead single to promote the full album. You rarely find albums where every song could have been released as a single, been a hit, and it could have re defined what the band was about. Day and Age is an album of hit singles in a compilation. That’s what I love about it. “Dustland Fairytale” is different from “Spaceman” which is different from “Neon Tiger”. Most albums, artists try to tell a story in the track progression. Day and Age feels more like a greatest hits package.

Give Up by The Postal Service – 2003 – I can’t think of any major album of it’s time, that sounds like Give Up. The lyrics and the rythms are just unmatched. The fact that you hear so many of these songs at major sporting events, and people enjoy the songs but have no idea what the songs or album are, says a lot. It’s electronic music structured in a way that doesn’t sound like standard electronic music. Songs like “Recycled Air” and “We Will Become Silhouettes” don’t sound like Daft Punk, David Guetta, etc. I think that’s why I like this album. It stretches the genre, but is also very pleasant.

The Bones of What You Believe by CHVRCHES – 2013 – This is another album that I feel pushes a genre and is something entirely different from most other albums that were out at the time. When I first heard “The Mother We Share”, I knew I found one of my new favorite bands. Lauren Mayberry’s vocals backed by Iain Cook and Martin Doherty on synthesizers are reminiscent of a New Wave/Dance genre style but it almost feels like they improve on it. Like they pushed it forward. The Wiki for the album calls the genre Synth Pop, but when you listen to the album, I’ve always felt the genre being played is kind of hard to pin down. The thing I know for sure, it’s fun to listen to.

On the Radio by Donna Summer – 1979 – This one is a compilation album of some of Donna Summer’s most recognized hit songs. Compilation albums can sometimes be great collections of an artists work, but I feel can lose steam in either the arrangement of the tracks, the songs selected, or just the overall feel of the final album. This is the best example of what a compilation album should be. Donna Summer made songs for the dance floor. The songs curated for this album span her career but the way the tracks are arranged are how I think a DJ would curate songs for a set. The tracks flow into each other. There are fast tracks mixed with medium tracks and slow tracks. If you were to do a Donna Summer night at a club, and just play this mix from first track to last, the way it’s set in the album, it would work in getting the crowd moving. It’s just so smart in it’s track selection and arrangement.

20181020_112319.jpg

Those albums were my top 10 favorite albums ever in no particular order. If you’re a fan of the same albums and ever want to talk about it, feel free to comment, otherwise if you’ve never heard of some of these albums and are looking for new music maybe give these ones a shot. I promise, you’re in for something different.

Have a Nice Day.

Last Minute List: 10 Acts Bumbershoot 2018

(I wrote this blog post 45 minutes before the gates opened on Day 1 of Bumbershoot.)

Bumbershoot has always been my favorite local music festival. Ever since the Experience Music Project gave me a free ticket back in 2012, I haven’t missed a year. It feels like a “reset” or a “recharge”. Sure the price has fluctuated like crazy and sometimes the crowd can get overwhelming, but it seems like it’s still a point of pride for a local performer to take part in the event and on more than one occasion acts have built their popularity in the local scene from an amazing set at Bumbershoot.

20170901_222334

Other than the major names on this year’s lineup (Blondie, Illenium, Lil Wayne, SZA, etc.) here are ten (“other”) acts I’m looking forward to this year in no particular order:
RL Grime – a solid debut EP, this EDM artist will definitely excite this year’s crowd with his raucous beats and bass drops.
Travis Thompson – this kid is amazing. From being featured on a track with Macklemore and Dave B to his Friday Fire Cypher on Sway’s show, this MC is making West Seattle proud.
Cherry Glazerr – Sounding sweet while having a sound that remains totally grungy, Cherry Glazerr fits perfectly with the “Seattle Sound”.
Great Grandpa – Ever since the release of their debut album, Great Grandpa has become a staple in the local music scene.
Elohim – A description of Elohim I read once said she’s a performer with a great message, great transitions within her songs, and a voice that’s fluid and able to glide throughout the melody.
Wimps – I just like watching Wimps. (haha)
Jo Passed – Jo Passed stood out to me at Sub Pop 30 earlier this month. From the hair flips to the other stage antics, Jo Passed are a band that look like they’re having fun on stage and it translates well into their sound.
The Regrettes – I saw the Regrettes at Chop Suey and these young punks really impressed me. I’m sure they’ll do the same at this year’s festival.
Black Pistol Fire – One of the most manic stage shows by a rock duo. The lead guitarist is a site to see as he runs around the stage, jumping, while also maintaining impressive skill on instrument.
Offbook! The Improvised Musical Podcast – If you’ve never heard about this podcast be prepared to be impressed. The premise, two improvisers welcome a guest and in the course of an hour they improvise a 45 minute long musical.

20180101_215957

Of course there are many acts that will entertain at this year’s Bumbershoot, but these ten are my picks for acts you might not have heard of that I think you should make time for. This is why I like Bumbershoot. It’s a chance to hear new music, watch a clown, or see a comedian you’ve only seen on television. Anytime I see people complain about the lineup, I always think to myself venting about it won’t change it, so you have two options in this situation you could either buy a pass or not. If you do, then keep an open mind. If you don’t, then the party’s still going to happen. (haha) I hope I see you there!

20170901_224046

(All photos were taken by me at Bumbershoot 2017)

7 Questions with Bree McKenna

20171116_220810

It’s 1:12p in the afternoon at Arcaro Boxing Gym. The air in the room is heavy after another hard workout.

Arcaro Boxing Gym is one of my favorite gyms in Seattle. The welcoming “barbershop”-style atmosphere attracts people from all walks of life. Around the room you’ll see corporate analysts mingling with firemen, helicopter pilots, and college students. You’ll see film directors holding mitts for members of the local music scene. You’ll see slam poets doing sit ups alongside restaurant owners. It really is an interesting atmosphere to both learn how to defend yourself, get a great workout, and meet a lot of interesting people.

After a mid day “lunch box” workout, I was sitting with Bree McKenna and Ryan Moon. I met Bree and Ryan at Arcaro Boxing Gym around a year ago. Both perform in local bands. Ryan for the band Turian. While Bree performs with several local bands including Who is She?, Childbirth, and of course, Tacocat.

Bree has always been one of my main motivations for exploring the local music scene. She’s just so down to earth and welcoming. There are times where I’ll see her at a show or we’ll catch each other at the gym and we’ll just chat about music. You would never think, this person played Coachella last year, this person performed on the main stage at Upstream Music Festival a few months ago, or that I saw this person perform at Bumbershoot back in 2012. Nope. She’s always just been Bree, that fun person who can throw a mean right hand, has questions about the last live music event you attended, and is more than happy to talk about the next live show you should check out.

Our workout had just ended. Bree, Ryan, and I were throwing around ideas of great interview gimmicks for this blog, when it hit me, what if I just asked some questions right now? I threw the idea out there to Bree, she smiled, and said, “Sure. Let’s do it.” So with Bree sitting on some seats outside of a boxing ring and myself sitting inside the boxing ring, we began our interview. After hearing the first question, Ryan looked at us and said, “I have to go, but this sounds like something I’ll want to read later.” We laughed, and he made his way out.

Right off the bat, I asked a question that had been on my mind for a while…

1.) I have to ask, what was with the Dave Mustaine article?

(haha) Well Vice had a series of articles about smaller musicians and their encounters with bigger musicians. The person who was organizing the series didn’t put in the introduction that the article was fiction and eventually it just got around. I didn’t want people to be disappointed especially big Metallica fans, so when people ask me about it I usually tell them I don’t want to talk about it.

Why’d you pick Dave? I mean the article was well written and I wouldn’t have been able to tell it was fake if it wasn’t for your Wikipedia page.

(haha) Yeah. We just look similar.

It’s the hair.

Yeah (haha)

20170512_144701

2.) A theme for most of the bands I’ve seen you perform in has been feminism and strong feminist ideals.

Yes.

However, another theme I noticed was a love for the 90’s.

Yeah, it’s a way for me to keep in touch with my teen self.

Without an explantion, what are three things from the 90’s that help motivate that love and attitude today?

Grunge, 10 Things I Hate About You, and Josie and the Pussycats (the film)

3.) Where’d the idea for Witch Chat come from (for those who don’t know Bree does an ongoing Insta-story feature called Witch Chat, which involve moments and stories told while participants wear witch hats)?

My freind had bought a bunch of witch hats online. We took a stack on tour and it just seemed natural. This was also around the same time Insta-stories were becoming a thing.

20180602_135354(0)

4.) Speaking about hats and fashion, I love your fashion sense.

Thanks!

Is there any style or fashion motif you wouldn’t by any means try?

Normcore (haha)

Alright. Asked and answered (haha).

5.) Of the people I’ve met in the local music scene, you seem like one of the more enthusiastic and welcoming, what makes you so excited about local music?

I work at a club and am around a lot of it. I try to be supportive. There’s a lot of good music.

Do you feel with the rapidly changing neighborhoods, that it’s having an effect on the “Seattle Sound”?

Kind of. People are more angrier about it. It’s more expensive to live in the neighborhoods like Capitol Hill than it used to be, and that’s motivating some of the music, but I kind of think the music is better now than it was when I first started.

We’ve both seen the documentary “Hype”. You can’t say it’s the same neighborhood that you saw in that documentary.

Yeah, but the problems we’re seeing in Seattle, it’s the same thing all across America. Things like Tech Companies and Big Business. Everything is getting expensive and it’s those pressures motivating things. It’s an interesting time to be living in America.

6.) Speaking about Seattle, what’s the coolest thing I can do in Seattle, if I only had one day in Seattle?

That ones tough. Let’s go back to that.

20171031_223159

7.) Alright (haha), and as my last question, what bands should I be listening to right now?

Oh wow. Local bands, I would say The Black Tones and Tres Leches, otherwise Lizzo.

I saw her at last year’s Block Party.

She was here?

Yeah. “Lizzo be eating”. She puts on a great show.

I’m thinking of trying to catch her with St.Vincent. Looks expensive though.

Is that the one with Florence + the Machine, and St.Vincent? With Lizzo on there, that’s a cool lineup.

Yeah, it should be fun.

Going back. What’s the coolest thing I can do in Seattle, if I only had one day in Seattle?

Come boxing at Arcaro boxing! First Class is free. (haha)

10 Acts Not to Miss at Capitol Hill Block Party 2018

Capitol Hill Block Party. When all the different social groups around Capitol Hill decide let’s avoid the weekend awkwardness that defines a summer weekend on the Hill and let’s party.

My experiences at Capitol Hill Block Party have been nothing but easy-going. You would think the diverse lineup would attract social groups that just wouldn’t mesh with one another and in any other situation you would be right, but Capitol Hill Block Party has always been different. For example, last year they had Angel Olsen play before Diplo. Rather than Angel Olsen fans push their way past Diplo fans who posted up near the front since opening to get a good view of Diplo, I saw a number of fans ask if they could stand in the front for Angel Olsen and once her set wrapped give back the spots to the Diplo fans. Their was no fighting, no tension, just a trust that they could get along mutually to see the bands they paid to see.

20170723_215403

What I always loved about this festival is that the diverse lineup brings out the neighborhood. It’s easy to be cynical about Capitol Hill Block Party. It’s easy to say that it perpetuates things that people don’t enjoy about this neighborhood mainly the annoying crowds that flood the hill on weekends bringing to light a type of toxic “bro” culture, but really, if that’s all you want to notice about this festival then you’re forgetting the main reason we all came to this festival to begin with, the music. If we could gather together for great music and if this festival could expose local bands to new listeners, then I’m more than happy to come out and support.

These are my picks for ten bands to check out at Capitol Hill Block Party 2018:

Alvvays – Friday, Main Stage 7:45p to 8:45p – Canadian indie pop rock band Alvvays are ready to impress at this year’s Block Party. Their last album ‘Antisocialites’ is a must hear mesh of fun dreamy vibes that sounds fun to sway and dance to.

20170128_204028The Ramblin Years – Friday, Neumos Stage 8:15p to 9:00p – Seattle-based country rock band The Ramblin Years (left) bring their ‘Merle Haggard’ reminiscent style of music back to Capitol Hill Block Party. The Ramblin Years have always been a personal favorite of mine and their recently released full length album ‘Small Town Lights’ will give you an early preview of what you can expect at Block Party.

The Black Tones – Friday, Barboza Stage 7:30p to 8:00p – The Black Tones describe themselves as “A goody bag of BLUES, PUNK and BLACK POWER!”. I’ve seen this trio perform several times and could not think of a better descriptor. Songs like “Welcome Mr.Pink” and “Plaid Pants” are great examples of what to expect from this set.

20170811_203419Ayron Jones – Sunday, Neumos Stage 7:10p to 7:40p – I’m a little surprised how I almost let an Ayron Jones (left) set nearly fly under the radar. His latest release ‘Audio Paint Job’ is a great example why many describe this artist as a combination of Prince and Nirvana. His shows are always a great time, and normally when he headlines they are sold out, so this is a great opportunity to see a local fixture of the Seattle rock scene.

Moorea Masa and the Mood – Friday, Neumos Stage 7:00p to 7:45p – I first saw Moorea Masa and the Mood perform live at last month’s Upstream Music Festival. I thought she was fantastic and have been listening to her debut album ‘Shine a Light’ ever since. Her easy R&B almost jazz sound is sure to captivate audiences looking to beat the heat at the Neumos Stage.

20171108_223417Gavin Turek – Saturday, Vera Stage 8:45p to 9:30p – Gavin Turek (left) is proof disco, new jack swing, and classic R&B are alive and well. It’s hard not to be drawn to Gavin Turek when she is on stage. Her voice mixed with her dance moves are simply alluring. If you like to dance, check out her album “Good Look For You”, and catch her set on Saturday

Bully – Sunday, Main Stage 3:45p to 4:30p – Sub Pop band Bully is pure grunge/punk fun. Hearing lead singer (and album engineer) Alicia Bognanno’s scream laden lyrics on their latest album ‘Losing’, paints a picture of artists that are sure to energize.

Chet Porter – Saturday, Vera Stage 7:30p to 8:15p – I attended a Chet Porter show last year with no idea exactly what to expect. What followed was what I can only describe as a mix of Porter Robinson blended with popular dance music. To be fair, Chet describes his sound as “music to pet dogs to”. You be the judge on Saturday.

20170513_191234

Kuinka – Saturday, Neumos Stage 9:30p to 10:15p – Kuinka (above) is Seattle’s emphatic answer to the modern pop folk craze. In the same vein as ‘Vance Joy’ or ‘The Lumineers’, Kuinka is going to get crowds moving with their joyous vibes. Their latest EP, ‘Stay Up Late’ will give you an idea of what to expect Saturday.

Brockhampton – Saturday, Main Stage 10:30p to 12:00a – Of all the headlining acts, Brockhampton is the one I am most excited to see. The story of the group is interesting. Self described as a hip hop boy band, the group formed on a Kanye West fan forum. Including 7 lyricists and several members behind the scenes (estimated 17 members), this group reminds me of a modern Wu Tang Clan, just a collection of unique performers with very distinct styles uniting to create art. To get an idea of what to expect check out the ‘Saturation’ trilogy, or even their performance of ‘Tonya’ on the Tonight Show.

There are a lot of acts to be excited for at this year’s Capitol Hill Block Party. It was hard to pick ten. I can’t say I’m not excited to see Father John Misty, Betty Who, Oh Wonder, Navvi, Great Grandpa, Close Encounter, Dude York, Mirror Ferrari, or even Hibou, among others. Really, it would be hard to explore this upcoming weekend and not find an act to fall in love with. All I can say is stay safe and stay cool.

(All photos were taken by me. Check out my instagram at “Cakeintherain206”.)